• Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Job done!

    Scythers
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Caution scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Scything fair

    Scything fair
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Job done!

    Scythers
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Caution scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Linden Meadow

    Scything
  • Scything

    Scything fair

    Scything fair

Scything

Scything is a good way to maintain meadows, It is also an environmentally friendly way to do it. Scything has a lot of advantages as a method of meadow management. It can mean that the cutting of the grass is spread over a longer period, thereby protecting and encourage wildlife habitats. It is also less disruptive to wildlife than using machinery. In some cases it is not easy to access meadows with machinery, so scything is the best alternative. Finally, it can be a social occasion when undertaken by a team of volunteers.

TTW Scything Sessions

TTW holds regular scything sessions at various locations around the town. In addition, TTW has a mini-scythe fair every summer.

We’ve been scything regularly at Fox’s Field, Linden Meadow, Coram’s Lane, Post Close and Longacre. Volunteers are always welcome to join us and we’re happy to provide training on how to use, sharpen and look after your scythe. We also have a stash of community scythes for anyone who doesn’t have their own.

Check out our up-coming community gardening sessions on the calendar page, or join our regular mailing list to stay informed. We’d love to see more people join in – it’s a wonderful skill to learn, and soon you’ll be teaching others too!

  • Post Close

    Scything at Post Close, Wellington
  • Linden Meadow

    Scything at Linden Meadow, Wellington
  • Post Close

    Scything at Post Close, Wellington
  • Fox’s Field

    Scything at Fox's Field Wellington
  • Longacre

    Scything by Transition Town Wellington
  • Post Close

    Scything at Post Close Wellington

Scything and Wilding go Hand-in-Hand

This movie ‘Why do scything and wilding go hand-in-hand?’ was filmed at a scything day at Julia Hailes’ rewilding project in Hooke, Dorset. The movie explains why scything is great for biodiversity. Machinery would most likely kill any wildlife in the meadow: scything, on the other hand, protects creatures in the grass far better. It is easy to leave areas wild and it is easier to cut around trees and plants. Wildflowers also thrive in areas that are cut with scythes. The movie features Andi Rickard of the Somerset Scythe School and also TTW’s Anita Roy and Adrian Rose.

Training sessions & equipment

If you have never tried scything, but would like to learn, then the Somerset Scythe School is run by Wellington resident (and UK scything champion!), Andi Rickard. Scything is becoming popular again and is a more efficient, quieter and easier method than using a strimmer. It is a method of cutting grass that is wholly in keeping with the ethos of the Transition Network because it uses no fossil fuels, it doesn’t pollute and makes virtually no sound. If that isn’t enough, it helps increase biodiversity, keep you fit and also is great fun.

  • Somerset Scythe School

    Somerset scything school
  • Somerset Scythe School

    Somerset scything school
  • Somerset Scythe School

    Somerset Scything school
  • Somerset Scythe School

    Somerset scything school

Get involved

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