• Trees

    Woodland

    Trees
  • Trees

    Create landscape features

    Tree screen
  • Trees

    Come in a variety of shapes

    Trees in winter
  • Trees

    Scots pine contrasting shape

    Feature tree
  • Trees

    Autumn leaves

    Autumn leaves
  • Trees

    Demonstrate solidity

    Solid tree roots
  • Trees

    Can create an avenue or cathedral

    Cathedral of trees
  • Trees

    Woodland

    Trees
  • Trees

    Create landscape features

    Tree screen
  • Trees

    Come in a variety of shapes

    Trees in winter
  • Trees

    Scots pine contrasting shape

    Feature tree
  • Trees

    Autumn leaves

    Autumn leaves
  • Trees

    Demonstrate solidity

    Solid tree roots
  • Trees

    Can create an avenue or cathedral

    Cathedral of trees

Trees

Trees affect the lives of all of us, even though we may not always appreciate that. They are vital in dealing with climate change, they provide interest and enjoyment to the landscape around us, they provide food and habitat for animals and insects.

Team Tree has been formed by Transition Town Wellington. The aim is two-fold. Firstly to encourage us all to notice and appreciate the trees all around us; and secondly to identify trees that we consider to be of particular value. We want to encourage the residents of Wellington to nominate trees they feel are special. It might be the shape, the value it brings to a particular location or view, or a tree that has evokes special memories, or one that has spectacular blossom. These trees will then be photographed, recorded and if felt appropriate an application will be made to the council for a Tree Preservation Order (TPO). Please fill in the form at the bottom of this page.

People’s Favourite Trees

These trees are so big that you can see them from space! Modern technology has allowed us to see every almost square metre of the globe. You can find each tree listed here. Just click on the map buttons to enter what 3 words. We recommend that you switch to ‘satellite view’ when you visit the what3words site.

Favourite tree map

1

Simon Parkin’s Oak

2

Anita Roy’s Copper Beach

3

Jackie Witt’s pine

4

Anita Roy’s Oak

5

Flip’s Wellingtonia

6

Flip’s Oak

7

Helen’s Acer Crimson King

8

Lindy’s Hornbeams

9

Fiona’s Oak

10

Jules’ Cherry

11

Joan’s Oak

12

Charle’s Oak

13

Addy’s Lucombe Oak

Please note

If you are looking at this page on a small screen such as a mobile phone in portrait mode, please turn it round to landscape mode to see the tree map. You may also have to zoom in a bit

  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Simon Parkin’s Oak

    Oak Tree

Simon Parkin’s Oak – “In the long hot days of the first lockdown, I wandered around Wellington on my allotted daily walk and suddenly noticed the trees. Everywhere! I looked up in wonder at these giants living among us. My favourite is an old oak that grows just down the road from me. My son and I measured the circumference of the trunk to try and guess how old it might be (anything rather than doing another Joe Wicks). It was about 2 metres, so maybe 80 years old – not much in oak years. I love how gnarled and contorted the tree is – looking like it’s straight out of a Brothers Grimm tale; its cavity large enough to climb into… or be swallowed up by!”

  • Anita Roy’s Copper Beech

    Copper beech
  • Anita Roy’s Copper Beech

    Copper beech
  • Anita Roy’s Copper Beech

    Copper beech
  • Anita Roy’s Copper Beech

    Copper beech
  • Anita Roy’s Copper Beech

    Copper beech

Anita Roy’s Copper Beech – “The old copper beech overhangs High Path like a vast umbrella. In the autumn it has the distinctive maroon-red tints that give it its name. The tree must pre-date the houses along this stretch of road – and now it is almost twice the size of them. Every time I walk past I thank the people in whose garden it grows for allowing it to flourish, to grow on its own sweet, slow way – its roots rucking up the path, its leaves littering their lawn, its shade shading out the windows, with human life accommodating it rather than riding roughshod over it. It’s a beauty: it changes the skyline and connects us to the clouds.”

  • Jackie Witt’s Pine

    Pine tree
  • Jackie Witt’s Pine

    Pine tree
  • Jackie Witt’s Pine

    Pine tree

Jackie Witt’s Pine – “Describing why a tree is special is such an interesting idea since sometimes this is not easy! And as I have discovered, people have sometimes deep and surprising reasons for being attached to certain trees – connected with their loved-ones for example. This tree is special to me mainly because I love pines and the uplifting, inspiring feeling that I get when I see or smell them. So straight, tall and upright – pointing directly to the sky. Perhaps I like being reminded of mountain pine forests and the fact that this tree is evergreen might have a lot to do with why I like it. I guess the short answer to why I like this tree is just because it makes me happy!”

  • Anita Roy’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Anita Roy’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Anita Roy’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Anita Roy’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Anita Roy’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Anita Roy’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Anita Roy’s Oak

    Oak tree

Anita Roy’s Oak – “This beautiful old oak stands alone in a hay field next to Linden Drive. Every time I walk up from the Basins I give it a sort of friendly wave as I pass: it looks like an old soldier, standing sentinel, the last man standing, as it were, in a field of grass. The farmer’s tractor must have had to go around it every time the field is cut, and I feel immensely grateful that the machinery has woven its way around it. Oaks are at the top of the league table in terms of the numbers of wildlife and different species that they support: each mature oak supports an entire ecosystem around it. There must have been many a close shave over the decades, but it’s made it through, and I hope it stands there, proudly, for many many years to come.”

  • Flip’s Wellingtonia

    Wellingtonia
  • Flip’s Wellingtonia

    Wellingtonia
  • Flip’s Wellingtonia

    Wellingtonia
  • Flip’s Wellingtonia

    Wellingtonia
  • Flip’s Wellingtonia

    Wellingtonia
  • Flip’s Wellingtonia

    Wellingtonia

Flip’s Wellingtonia – “There is a Wellingtonia pine (Sequoiadendron giganteum – giant redwood) in the field between Foxdown Hill and Rockwell Green. It grows next to a huge oak tree (see below). These two trees have been there from before I was born. I moved away from Wellington to London many years ago, and I had almost forgotten about them. Then, moving back a few years ago, I realised how important these trees had been to me as a child. I used to refer to them as Laurel and Hardy because of their shapes. Although I had always seen them as part of the landscape it’s only recently that I have gone up and touched them. They are absolutely flipping huge! From a distance you don’t realise how big they’re going to be until you go up and try to put your arms around them. I think it would take at least five of me to go round. This giant tree is an important part of the landscape from so many angles. It is not the only one in the field, but it looks particularly tall and grand next to the oak. I would love to see it preserved for the future generations.”

  • Flip’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Flip’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Flip’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Flip’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Flip’s Oak

    Oak tree

Flip’s Oak tree – “The oak tree, like the giant redwood I have mentioned above, stands in the field between Foxdown Hill and Rockwell Green. The oak is perfectly formed and changes through the seasons from golden green in the spring through to dark green and then brown in the autumn as the leaves fall. The acorns are a magnet to the deer who gather underneath eating them. The beautiful oak alongside the elegant giant redwood make a perfect combination and one that has been painted by local artists and photographed by many. The oak provides a habitat for a lot of wildlife as well as providing the acorns for the deer. This lovely oak deserves to be preserved.”

  • Helen’s Crimson King

    Acer Crimson King
  • Helen’s Acer Crimson King

    Acer Crimson King
  • Helen’s Acer Crimson King

    Acer Crimson King
  • Helen’s Acer Crimson King

    Acer Crimson King
  • Helen’s Acer Crimson King

    Acer Crimson King
  • Helen’s Acer Crimson King

    Acer Crimson King
  • Helen’s Acer Crimson King

    Acer Crimson King

Helen’s Acer crimson king – “This beautiful maple grows in a patch of grass owned by the council. Living on Springfield I’ve been walking past for many years, and mainly focusing on the area under the tree. Kate Holloway and TTW planted our first soft fruit patch there in 2015, with blackcurrants and gooseberries. Then, once I learnt about meadow management, I started raking up the grass cuttings every time the council team strimmed it to make it more suitable for wildflowers, and after some negotiation, finally got permission for TTW to turn it into a meadow. We’ve been raking, scything and sowing wildflower seeds there ever since, and now the area boasts a wide variety of wildflowers swaying with the long grass all summer, as well as a new herb bed.

But I must admit I never really ‘saw’ the tree until this spring: the blossom was absolutely stunning. A pale yellow flower with a hint of lime green, formed in clusters reaching for the sunlight and starting to bloom before the leaves come out, you might even mistake them for the new leaves themselves! But no; as the leaves emerge, a rich deep burgundy, they are in striking contrast to the blossom. I was struck by this trees subtle beauty, maybe not as showy as the white cherry blossom out at the same time, but just as beautiful when you get up close. In summer, the tree becomes much more solid and present with its dark shape contrasting with the green all around. This is a fine specimen – now I’ve noticed it I’ve seen the same species growing in towns and suburbs, but none are quite as handsome as this tree on Corams Lane. The Team Tree project has definitely encouraged me to ‘look up’ more and really appreciate the trees around me that I walk past every day.”

  • Lindy’s Hornbeams

    Hornbeam
  • Lindy’s Hornbeams

    Hornbeam
  • Lindy’s Hornbeams

    Hornbeam
  • Lindy’s Hornbeams

    Hornbeam

Lindy’s Hornbeams – “I love the two trees at the Station Rd, Victoria St, Courtland Rd crossroads. Their natural beauty help to offset the drab, austerity of the police station building and brighten up what would otherwise have been a very dull corner. They stand there like two firm, but friendly sentinels by the police station. Their sense of stability stabilises me. They give me a moment’s pleasure all year round, every time I pass. However we, or rather my more expert friend, are not entirely sure what they are! They’re probably some kind of Hornbeam (Carpinus Betulus?). Alternatively could they be Elms or Southern Beeches or Southern Elmbeams? Maybe someone else knows and can inform me.”

  • Fiona’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Fiona’s Oak

    Oak tree

Fiona’s Oak ‘Old Friend’ – “When I first moved to Wellington after my marriage broke down, I started walking down through the basins each morning and discovered a beautiful craggy old tree which hangs over the footpath there. At a time filled with uncertainty whilst I was starting a new life it felt like a constant reassuring presence. I felt drawn to it, inspired by both its size and its age. When I see it, I can’t help but wonder what the tree has witnessed over the centuries it has been stood sentry beside the path.”

  • Jules’ Cherry

    Cherry tree
  • Jules’ Cherry

    Cherry tree
  • Jules’ Cherry

    Cherry tree

Jules’ Cherry – This tree is divine – a bower of blossoms every Spring, under which we, myself and our daughter, have taken a photo every year. The perfume is glorious, the detail is spectacular – when we see this tree in bloom, we know that Spring has truly arrived! We love this tree!

  • Joan’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Joan’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Joan’s Oak

    Oak tree
  • Joan’s Oak

    Oak tree

Joan’s Oak – When I first visited my later-on-to-be husband, I was welcomed by a carpet of wild cyclamen on a small lawn, there by the grace of the shade provided by a magnificent oak. I fell in love. Not sure how old the tree is, but oh, if only it could talk! It grows where, during the Civil War, the original Longforth House was razed to the ground from missiles sent from Foxdown Hill. (The base of the house can, apparently, be made out just under the surface of the – now – football ground). So was this magnificent tree there to witness that? A sword (now in Wellington museum) officially identified from that period, was found nearby, and a cannon ball in a neighbour’s garden. Was the tree then an acorn, or just the glint of an acorn in its ‘parent’s’ eye? As I’ve known it, and before, it has provided a stout branch for a swing for generations of children. They stand on a wall next to the tree, grab the swing, and launch themselves way, way, high up over the drive. (No, if you love that child, or even if you don’t, you can’t watch). It shelters the entrance pillars, on top of which go floral decorations for Christmas, Jubilee, and – soon – a coronation. For walkers – dog or not – it tells them they’ve reached the highest point on the hill and so provides an excuse to admire the tree as they catch their breath. It’s very beautiful, strong, sturdy, and extremely useful. Well, it’s a tree, so of course it’s all of that. If you’re there, say hello. And the cyclamens will thank you for saving their home.

  • Charles’ Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Charles’ Oak

    Oak Tree
  • Charles’ Oak

    Oak tree

Charles’ Oak – We can see this tree from our house and since we have moved to Wellington in 2022 this is ‘the’ oak tree in what we have dubbed ‘Oak Tree Field’. We have twin 3-year old boys and regularly talk about this tree as it passes through the seasons. It’s a landmark to us and a symbol of the rural England that I want my boys to know as they grow up.

  • Addy’s Lucombe Oak

    Lucombe Oak
  • Addy’s Lucombe Oak

    Lucombe Oak
  • Addy’s Lucombe Oak

    Lucombe Oak
  • Addy’s Lucombe Oak

    Lucombe Oak
  • Addy’s Lucombe Oak

    Lucombe Oak

Addy’s Lucombe Oak in Linden Meadow. This Tree is so special to me. To start with, this was my Grieving Tree: it’s now my Thinking Tree. After the sudden death of my husband, leaving me with a baby and young child, I had to keep things as normal as possible at home for the children so it was difficult to let out my emotions. I was drawn to this tree. Out walking my dogs, I would end up at this tree, where I would sit and let out my tears of anger and grief. I’d always give her a hug and the Tree would then lend me its strength to return home and carry on. She didn’t care how much I cried or screamed. I strongly believe that she helped me through an extremely difficult time.
Now, several years on, if I have a problem, or a decision to make, or if I’m just feeling low, I return to the Tree. And somehow she always gives me the answers I need & the strength to carry on through life’s battles. She really is beautiful.

Nominate your tree

Town Centre Greening

The Town Centre Greening group started life in 2018 as The Street Tree Project. Its aim was to get trees planted into the pavements in the town centre to improve air quality, shade and shelter, provision for wildlife and, not least, make it more attractive. We raised £1000, had support and promise of more funding from Somerset West and Taunton Council and Wellington Town Council adopted the scheme allocating funding of £9000. Unfortunately, the pandemic intervened and progress ground to a halt. Last year, ground work investigations showed a complex underground network of services at the chosen sites and the council decided the cost was too high to proceed. We are hoping this may be revisited and reconsidered in the future. Meanwhile, we are working with Wellington Town Council to introduce more shrubs, perennials and evergreens, which also flower at different times of the year and provide food for pollinating insects and butterflies into the town centre instead.

Previously, once the hanging baskets and troughs came down there was very little in the way of greenery or colour from September through to May of the following year. As a result the town looked drab, lifeless and unattractive with just a brief interlude when the Christmas decorations are up.

We suggested planting evergreen, flowering shrubs into the planters which had Liquidamber trees in them for a few years but which died because the District Council have traditionally been responsible for street watering here but only do so between May and September. The trees couldn’t survive several droughts outside of these months despite our efforts. WTC have refurbished the planters and put in evergreen, white-flowering Escallonias which we hope aren’t over-pruned and should grow to at least 1.5 metres. These will look good and contribute a little to improving air quality and provide for insects and birds.

Street trees

We also adopted the beds in Lancer Court which had been used as ashtrays and rubbish bins for years. Two of these don’t get any rain as they’re underneath an overhanging roof so need weekly watering. We planted them up and the shopkeepers agreed to help water them regularly but this didn’t work out and a lot of the plants died. We have now replanted and now water ourselves. However, we are hoping that they will be included when the new WTC watering scheme is launched. They are currently recruiting a Town Warden and all-year-round watering will come under their remit. Once we know plants will be regularly watered and looked after, we hope to use our remaining funds to put in more planters with evergreen, flowering shrubs around the four main streets in the town.

We also helped to select plants for the green railing displays which are intended to provide all year round greenery as well as some flowers beloved of bees and other insects in the summer. There were difficulties with the company looking after this, so we planted a lot of them ourselves and watered several times a week. Most have survived and some have thrived. The plants that haven’t thrived will be replaced in the autumn.

Somerset tree strategy

In January 2023 a Somerset Tree Strategy for 2023 – 2033 was published. In preparing this document a number of organisations come together. These were the Environment Agency, Naturally Somerset, Exmoor National Park, Quantock Hills, the Forestry Commission, the Woodland Trust and Somerset Council. These organisations were supported by Evolving Forests.

Somerset trees

The strategy includes short, medium and long term priorities, and is part of reinforcing a climate resilient Somerset. Trees are found in different environments, such as forests, moors and towns. Treescapes is a term that acknowledges the importance of trees not only in their visual impact and their support of wildlife, but in their importance in combating climate change. Treescapes need to be resilient and adaptable and the tree cover needs to be expanded. The Strategy can be downloaded on the button below. The Evidence Document which can be downloaded on button below, sets out the methodology behind the Strategy. It covers the various statistics and the context in which the strategy was formulated. 

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