• Wildlife

    Frog

    Wildlife
  • Wildlife

    Bug hotel

    Bug hotel
  • Wildlife

    Bird watching

    Bird watching
  • Wildlife

    Bird

    Bird on a branch
  • Wildlife

    Swains Lane Nature Reserve

    Swains Lane Nature Reserve
  • Wildlife

    Slow worm

    Slow worm
  • Wildlife

    Robin

    Robin
  • Wildlife

    Otter

    Otter
  • Wildlife

    Frog

    Wildlife
  • Wildlife

    Bug hotel

    Bug hotel
  • Wildlife

    Bird watching

    Bird watching
  • Wildlife

    Bird

    Bird on a branch
  • Wildlife

    Swains Lane Nature Reserve

    Swains Lane Nature Reserve
  • Wildlife

    Slow worm

    Slow worm
  • Wildlife

    Robin

    Robin
  • Wildlife

    Otter

    Otter

Wildlife

The TTW Wildlife group was formed in 2019, in response to an overwhelming desire in the community to get together to do something positive for our endangered species and the catastrophic loss of biodiversity we are seeing in our towns, cities and across the countryside.

While there is a considerable overlap with the Food Group, the Wildlife Group is particularly focusing on creating healthier and happier habitat for all the plants, birds, animals and insects.

With that in mind we worked to create a ‘Wildlife Map’ of Wellington highlighting particular species and where they were most likely to be found. It also indicates the people who have won a gold star for the number of species they have found. (Some of the logos, painted by Anita Roy, can be seen below). Now there is an international app (inaturalist.org) that allows people to submit a photograph of an animal that they have found in their garden. The app then identifies it and records where it was found and when it was submitted.

We are keen to encourage wilder gardens, with fences designed to allow hedgehogs and other animals to move around. Providing messy piles of twigs and branches as valuable hibernation grounds for animals and insects is also important. Growing flowers for pollinators all year round, and working with farmers, landowners and the council to manage our green spaces will be of benefit to wildlife. Wildflower verges, roundabouts and the edges of fields and parks provide vital habitats for a whole range of insects and the birds and other animals that feed on them.

If you are concerned about species extinctions, soil erosion, bee population decline and all these associated areas, please come along to any of the Wildlife Group meetings. You can click on the events tab in then main menu above for the dates. We would be delighted to see you!

Wildlife Mapping

The project to map wildlife in Wellington was started in 2021. The intention was to encourage people to provide habitats and improve things for wildlife in their gardens. Then when a star was awarded depending on the number of improvements had been made for wildlife – 10 or more achieved a bronze star; 15 or more achieved a silver star; and 20 or more achieved a gold star.

The habitat improvements are given in the Gardening for Wildlife Book (see below).

Wellington Wildlife map

Wildlife Mapping – How to make your own map

Do you like TTW’s new wildlife map? And our gardening for wildlife campaign? We would love to spread this idea for community action for wildlife in other local towns. If you would like to copy either the map idea or recreate the gardening for wildlife booklet to be relevant for your local area, we are happy to share the artwork.

Wellington Wildlife map

Wildlife Mapping with iNaturalist

iNaturalist is a social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe. The buttons below take you to our local projects in Wellington.

iNaturalist has been going for over 15 years and it has some 2.7million contributors. So far it has created over 146,000,000 verifiable observations, covering more than 430,000 species. About a million observations are being added per week. iNaturalist is an independent USA based non-profit organisation. We make use of it when we carry out a Bioblitz on our various projects. It is a useful tool in identifying species of plant or animal. A bioblitz is a communal citizen-science effort to record as many species within a designated location and time period as possible. Bioblitzes are great ways to engage the public to connect to their environment while generating useful data for science and conservation.

iNaturlist

Gardening for Wildlife

There are many plants that attract wildlife into a garden. The Gardening for Wildlife book is a very useful resource for people wishing to encourage wildlife. It is not just a question of using the right plants. Creating shade and providing water is also important. Shrubs and trees can create dappled and/or full shade which some animals prefer. Creating a hedgehog home is something to consider.

Trees are a safe place for birds, especially in towns where there are cats and dogs as pets. Bird boxes should also be fitted high enough to provide a safe place. Ideally the hole in the bird box should face between north and east and there should be a clear flight path to it.

Water in the form of ponds can be a big attraction for wildlife. They should be designed as wildlife ponds by providing a beach area at one end or other means for creatures to get out of the water. A good post will attract all sorts of insects such as dragon flies and water boatmen. If a pond is not practical for other reasons, such as young children, then maybe a bog garden would be a possibility.

Rotting wood, in the form of a wood pile or stumpery will be attractive to a number of different animals. Similarly, a bug hotel is an easy thing to create for insects.

Plants can be carefully chosen to attract pollinators. Some examples are lavender, hollyhocks and of course many wildflowers. Some plants such as buddleia are well known as attractive to butterflies.

Birds

Are familiar in many of our gardens and they can be encouraged with bird feeders and bird baths. Some birds eat seeds, berries, fruit, insects, other birds, eggs, small mammals, fish, buds, larvae, aquatic invertebrates, acorns and other nuts, aquatic vegetation, grain, dead animals, garbage, and much more…

During the spring and summer months, most songbirds eat mainly insects and spiders. Insects are easy to find and catch, and are very nutritious. Birds such as blue tits enjoy eating the aphids that could damage your crops. During autumn and winter, however, birds that don’t migrate must eat fruits and seeds to survive.

[Mostly direct copy off net]

  • Male Chaffinch

    Male Chaffinch
  • Blackbird

    Blackbird
  • Mallard

    Mallard
  • Starling

    Starling
  • Dunnock

    Dunnock
  • Reed Warbler

    Reed Warbler
  • House Sparrow

    House Sparrow
  • Green Woodpecker

    Green Woodpecker
  • Black Cap

    Black Cap
  • Redstart

    Redstart
  • Kestrel

    Kestrel
  • Blue Tit

    Blue Tit

Mammals

Whilst a lot of emphasis has been give to provision for bees and other insects, there are also mammals that can be encouraged to visit our gardens. Many of us will have been visited by foxes, even in the centre of large towns and cities. Other regular visitors can include hedgehogs, squirrels, bats and mice. Hedgehogs are the gardeners’ friend because they will enjoy eating insects that attach our plants. Providing gaps in boundary fences to facilitate them traveling between gardens is to be encouraged. Also providing a small hedgehog home is easy to do. Details are given in the Gardening for Wildlife book (above).

Deer can sometimes be found wandering into our gardens and of course the presence of moles is often clear from mole hills in our lawns.

Some of these creatures will also enjoy a garden pond, but it should have a beach at one end or a plank, or similar, to allow them to get out of the pond.

  • European Mole

    European mole
  • Red-toothed Shrew

    Red-toothed shrew
  • Hedgehog

    Hedgehog
  • Fox

    Fox
  • Mouse

    Mouse
  • Rabbit

    Rabbit
  • Grey squirrel

    Grey Squirrel
  • Bat

    Fruit bat

Reptiles and amphibians

Reptiles and amphibians will be attract to your garden, especially if you have a pond. Slow worms, newts, frogs and toads are friends of the gardener. They eat eat slugs, snails and aphids. Grass snakes eat amphibians, so they are less likely to be found unless you have plenty of amphibians for them to feed on.

Slow worms like warmth and they will be attracted to places that heat up in the sun. So sheets of corrugated metal or rockery stones are attractive to them.

Cats are the enemy of many of these creatures, so providing hiding places and routes from water to safety is important. Avoid the use of pesticides too, as these will be. harmful to these creatures.

  • Common Slow worm

    Common slowworm
  • European toad

    European toad
  • Great crested newt

    Great crested newt
  • European Common Frog

    European Common Frog
  • Common slow worm

    Common slowworm
  • Smooth newt

    Smooth newt
  • Viviparous Lizard

    Viviparous Lizard

Insects

Insects are often considered pests. However, many are the gardeners’ friend. Whilst aphids are a pest, there are insects such as beetles, lacewings, hover flies and ladybirds that eat aphids. Planting pollen-rich plants will encourage these predatory insects into your garden.

Daisies and other ‘flat’ flowers such as member of the carrot family are good for attracting small insects and beetles. Trumpet shaped flowers will attract moths. Double, fancy flowers are less attractive for insects. So, a wild flower lawn or an herbaceous border with wild flowers is ideal. Choose plants that flower in various seasons and preferably some that are perennial or biennial. A herbaceous border can also contain some shrubs.

  • Reed Admiral butterfly

    Red Admiral Butterfly
  • Thick-legged flower beetle

    Thick-legged flower beetle
  • Dock bug

    Dock Bug
  • Red-tailed bumble bee

    Red-tailed Bumble bee
  • Broad Centurion Fly

    Broad Centurion Fly
  • Grizzled skipper

    Grizzled skipper
  • Dark Edged Bee Fly

    Dark edged bee fly
  • Peacock butterfly

    Peacock butterfly

Monthly meetings

Monthly meetings: TTW monthly meeting is mainly focused on community gardening activities, but covers a range of other things too. We like to keep the meetings focused on actions & things to do. Everyone is welcome – it’s a great way to meet new people and share new ideas. Second Wednesday of each month 7.30-9pm. Venue changes; see news or calendar

Community gardening sessions: These are regular, at different sites, throughout the year. Please check the calendar, join our WhatsApp group (send us your phone number via the contacts form below), or join our mailing list for regular updates.

  • Eco-lodge

    TTW monthly meeting
  • Eco-lodge

    TTW monthly meeting
  • Swains Lane Barn

    TTW monthly meeting
  • Wellesley Park

    Dreaming Session 2023
  • Eco-lodge

    TTW monthly meeting
  • Swains Lane Barn

    TTW monthly meeting
  • Eco-lodge

    TTW monthly meeting
  • Wellesley Park

    Dreaming Session 2023
  • The Local Folk

    Wildlife AGM 2023
  • The Local Folk

    Wildlife AGM 2023
  • The Local Folk

    Wildlife AGM 2023
  • The Local Folk

    Wildlife AGM 2023

Get involved

If you are interested in this group please fill in the form below

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