• Books

    Books to read

    Books
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Books

    Books ready to read

    Books
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Book reading
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Books

    Reading

    Book reading
  • Books

    Bookworms meeting

    Bookworms
  • Books

    Books to read

    Books
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Books

    Books ready to read

    Books
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Book reading
  • Books

    Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Books

    Reading

    Book reading
  • Books

    Bookworms meeting

    Bookworms

Books

The TTW book club ‘Bookworms’ started meeting in September 2022. The group meets every couple of months. It is a lovely mix of the social, (there’s usually wine, tea and cake), and literary, with a bit of education thrown in. The books and themes chosen for discussion tend to focus on ecological subjects, but there has been a significant variety of styles and genres. ‘Rebirding’ by Benedict MacDonald, for example, is an inspiring book that doesn’t just lament the decline of British wildlife, but offers a vision of how things could be, with plans for how working with nature would actually make sense for the economy. Another of our choices, ’H is for Hawk’, is a personal memoir by Helen Macdonald, about her recovery from the grief of losing her father by immersing herself in training a goshawk. An unusual theme but a gripping read.

Bookworms

In addition to the books mentioned above, we have reviewed ‘Entangled Life’ by Merlin Sheldrake, ‘Regenesis’ by George Monbiot, ‘Rebugging the Planet’ by Vicki Hird and ‘What a Plant Knows’ by Daniel Chamovitz. Other books of interest include ‘Braiding Sweetgrass’ by Robin Wall Kimmerer who is both a scientist and a member of the Citizen Potawatoni Nation. She speaks of her hopes for an ‘integrated science’, where an objective scientific approach can be informed and enriched by indigenous wisdom and a more intuitive and spiritual way of relating to all of the natural world. In reading Braiding Sweetgrass one is taken on a journey that is mythic and sacred as well as providing a guide to the value of attentiveness to what is around us. Another is called ‘Wanderland’ by Jini Reddy, which is about a young woman’s search for ‘the magical in the landscape’. So the theme of that meeting was about the spirituality that many of us find in nature and the way that this can deepen the scientific approach that has dominated most of our education in western culture.

Books

The aim of our meetings is to provide a pleasant social atmosphere in which to talk about some of the more fascinating and deeper themes that underpin TTW’s work for nature. In Merlin Sheldrake’s ‘Entangled Life’, for example, he describes the way that all of the natural world, including humans, rely in some way on fungi for our existence, and we learn that, amazingly, fungi can solve problems and manipulate animal behaviour. One can easily end up wondering if it’s fungi that’s actually in charge of the world. You don’t need to have read the books, just come along and enjoy the discussion and pleasure of sharing ideas.

  • Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Bookworms

    Bookworms
  • Bookworms

    Bookworms

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